Age-Related Memory Loss - HelpGuide.org (2023)

aging issues

Worried about your forgetfulness? Learn what's normal when it comes to memory loss and aging, and how to recognize the signs of more serious problems.

Age-Related Memory Loss - HelpGuide.org (1)

Memory loss and aging

We’ve all misplaced keys, blanked on someone’s name, or forgotten a phone number. When you’re young, you don’t tend to pay much attention to these lapses, but as you grow older, you may worry about what they mean. Perhaps you start to talk about a movie you saw recently when you realize you can’t remember the title. You’re giving directions to your house when you suddenly blank on a familiar street name. Or you find yourself standing in the middle of the kitchen wondering what you went in there for. Memory lapses can be frustrating, but most of the time they aren’t cause for concern. Age-related memory changes are not the same thing as dementia.

As you grow older, you experience physiological changes that can cause glitches in brain functions you’ve always taken for granted. It takes longer to learn and recall information. You’re not as quick as you used to be. In fact, you may mistake this slowing of your mental processes for true memory loss. But in most cases, if you give yourself time, the information will come to mind. So, while it’s true that certain brain changes are inevitable when it comes to aging, major memory problems are not one of them. That’s why it’s important to know the difference between normal age-related forgetfulness and the symptoms that may indicate a developing cognitive problem.

Age-related memory loss and the brain

The brain is capable of producing new brain cells at any age, so significant memory loss is not an inevitable result of aging. But just as it is with muscle strength, you have to use it or lose it. Your lifestyle, habits, and daily activities have a huge impact on the health of your brain. Whatever your age, there are many ways you can improve your cognitive skills, prevent memory loss, and protect your grey matter.

Furthermore, many mental abilities are largely unaffected by normal aging, such as:

  • Your ability to do the things you've always done and continue to do often
  • The wisdom and knowledge you've acquired from life experience
  • Your innate common sense and your ability to form reasonable arguments and judgments

Three causes of age-related memory loss

  1. The hippocampus, a region of the brain involved in the formation and retrieval of memories, often deteriorates with age.
  2. Hormones and proteins that protect and repair brain cells and stimulate neural growth also decline with age.
  3. Older people often experience decreased blood flow to the brain, which can impair memory and lead to changes in cognitive skills.

Normal forgetfulness vs. dementia

For most people, occasional lapses in short-term memory are a normal part of the aging process, not a warning sign of serious mental deterioration or the onset of Alzheimer's or another dementia.

The following types of memory lapses are normal among older adults and generally are not considered warning signs of dementia:

  • Occasionally forgetting where you left things you use regularly, such as glasses or keys.
  • Forgetting names of acquaintances or blocking one memory with a similar one, such as calling a grandson by your son's name.
  • Occasionally forgetting an appointment or walking into a room and forgetting why you entered.
  • Becoming easily distracted or having trouble remembering what you've just read, or the details of a conversation.
  • Not quite being able to retrieve information you have “on the tip of your tongue.”

Does your memory loss affect your ability to function?

The primary difference between age-related memory loss and dementia is that the former isn't disabling. The memory lapses have little impact on your daily performance and ability to do what you want to do. Dementia, on the other hand, is marked by a persistent, disabling decline in two or more intellectual abilities such as memory, language, judgment, and abstract thinking.

When memory loss becomes so pervasive and severe that it disrupts your work, hobbies, social activities, and family relationships, you may be experiencing the warning signs of Alzheimer's disease, or another disorder that causes dementia, or a condition that mimics dementia.

Normal age-related memory changesSymptoms that may indicate dementia
Able to function independently and pursue normal activities, despite occasional memory lapses.Difficulty performing simple tasks (paying bills, dressing appropriately, washing up). Forgetting how to do things you've done many times.
Able to recall and describe incidents of forgetfulness.Unable to recall or describe specific instances where memory loss caused problems.
May pause to remember directions, but don't get lost in familiar places.Get lost or disoriented even in familiar places; unable to follow directions.
Occasional difficulty finding the right word, but no trouble holding a conversation.Words are frequently forgotten, misused, or garbled. Repeat phrases and stories in same conversation.
Judgment and decision-making ability the same as always.Trouble making choices. May show poor judgment or behave in socially inappropriate ways.

Symptoms of mild cognitive impairment (MCI)

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an intermediate stage between normal age-related cognitive changes and the more serious symptoms that indicate dementia.

MCI can involve problems with memory, language, thinking, and judgment that are greater than normal age-related changes, but the line between MCI and normal memory problems is not always a clear one. The difference is often one of degrees. For example, it's normal as you age to have some problems remembering the names of people. However, it's not normal to forget the names of your close family and friends and then still be unable to recall them after a period of time.

If you have mild cognitive impairment, you and your family or close friends will likely be aware of the decline in your memory or mental function. But, unlike people with full-blown dementia, you are still able to function in your daily life without relying on others.

[Read: Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)]

While many people with MCI eventually develop Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia, that doesn't mean it's inevitable. Some people with MCI plateau at a relatively mild stage of decline while others even return to normal. The course is difficult to predict, but in general, the greater the degree of memory impairment, the greater your risk of developing dementia some time in the future.

Symptoms of MCI

Common symptoms include:

  • Frequently losing or misplacing things.
  • Frequently forgetting conversations, appointments, or events.
  • Difficulty remembering the names of new acquaintances.
  • Difficulty following the flow of a conversation.

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(Video) BCH Lecture: Memory Loss: What’s Normal, What’s Not?

When to see a doctor for memory loss

It's time to consult a doctor when memory lapses become frequent enough or sufficiently noticeable to concern you or a family member. If you get to that point, make an appointment as soon as possible to talk with your primary physician and have a thorough physical examination. Even if you're not displaying all the necessary symptoms to indicate dementia, now may be a good time to take steps to prevent a small problem becoming a larger one.

Your doctor can assess your personal risk factors, evaluate your symptoms, eliminate reversible causes of memory loss, and help you obtain appropriate care. Early diagnosis can treat reversible causes of memory loss, lessen decline in vascular dementia, or improve the quality of life in Alzheimer's or other types of dementia.

What to expect at your doctor's visit

The doctor will ask you a lot of questions about your memory, including:

  • How long have you or others noticed a problem with your memory?
  • What kinds of things have been difficult to remember?
  • Did the difficulty come on gradually or suddenly?
  • Are you having trouble doing ordinary things?

The doctor also will want to know what medications you're taking, how you've been eating and sleeping, whether you've been depressed or stressed lately, and other questions about what's been happening in your life. Chances are the doctor will also ask you or your partner to keep track of your symptoms and check back in a few months. If your memory problem needs more evaluation, your doctor may send you to a neuropsychologist.

Reversible causes of memory loss

It's important to remember that memory loss doesn't automatically mean that you have dementia. There are many other reasons why you may be experiencing cognitive problems, including stress, depression, and even vitamin deficiencies. That's why it's so important to go to a doctor to get an official diagnosis if you're experiencing problems.

[Read: What's Causing Your Memory Loss?]

Sometimes, even what looks like significant memory loss can be caused by treatable conditions and reversible external factors, such as:

Depression. Depression can mimic the signs of memory loss, making it hard for you to concentrate, stay organized, remember things, and get stuff done. Depression is a common problem in older adults—especially if you're less social and active than you used to be or you've recently experienced a number of important losses or major life changes (retirement, a serious medical diagnosis, the loss of a loved one, moving out of your home).

Vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 protects neurons and is vital to healthy brain functioning. In fact, a lack of B12 can cause permanent damage to the brain. Older people have a slower nutritional absorption rate, which can make it difficult for you to get the B12 your mind and body need. If you smoke or drink, you may be at particular risk. If you address a vitamin B12 deficiency early, you can reverse the associated memory problems. Treatment is available in the form of a monthly injection.

Thyroid problems. The thyroid gland controls metabolism: if your metabolism is too fast, you may feel confused, and if it's too slow, you can feel sluggish and depressed. Thyroid problems can cause memory problems such as forgetfulness and difficulty concentrating. Medication can reverse the symptoms.

Alcohol abuse. Excessive alcohol intake is toxic to brain cells, and alcohol abuse leads to memory loss. Over time, alcohol abuse may also increase the risk of dementia. Because of the damaging effects of excessive drinking, experts advise limiting your daily intake to just 1-2 drinks.

Dehydration. Older adults are particularly susceptible to dehydration. Severe dehydration can cause confusion, drowsiness, memory loss, and other symptoms that look like dementia. It's important to stay hydrated (aim for 6-8 drinks per day). Be particularly vigilant if you take diuretics or laxatives or suffer from diabetes, high blood sugar, or diarrhea.

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Side effects of medication. Many prescribed and over-the-counter drugs or combinations of drugs can cause cognitive problems and memory loss as a side effect. This is especially common in older adults because they break down and absorb medication more slowly. Common medications that affect memory and brain function include sleeping pills, antihistamines, blood pressure and arthritis medication, muscle relaxants, anticholinergic drugs for urinary incontinence and gastrointestinal discomfort, antidepressants, anti-anxiety meds, and painkillers.

Are you taking three or more drugs?

As well as certain individual medications, taking too many medications can also create cognitive problems. A recent study found that the more medications you take, the higher your risk for brain atrophy. Researchers found that the loss of gray matter was most acute in people who took three or more different medications. If you are concerned about the medications you're taking, talk to your doctor. But do NOT stop taking your medications without your doctor's consent.

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Age-Related Memory Loss - HelpGuide.org (5)

Compensating for memory loss

The same practices that contribute to healthy aging and physical vitality also contribute to a healthy memory. So, by taking steps early to prevent cognitive decline, you'll also be improving all other aspects of your life as well.

[Read: Preventing Alzheimer's Disease]

Stay social. People who aren't socially engaged with family and friends are at higher risk for memory problems than people who have strong social ties. Quality face-to-face social interaction can greatly reduce stress and is powerful medicine for the brain, so schedule time with friends, join a book club, or visit the local senior center. And be sure to put your phone away and focus fully on the people you're with if you want the full brain benefit.

Stop smoking. Smoking heightens the risk of vascular disorders that can cause stroke and constrict arteries that deliver oxygen to the brain. When you quit smoking, the brain quickly benefits from improved circulation.

Manage stress. Cortisol, the stress hormone, damages the brain over time and can lead to memory problems. But even before that happens, stress or anxiety can cause memory difficulties in the moment. When you're stressed out or anxious, you're more likely to suffer memory lapses and have trouble learning or concentrating. But simple stress management techniques can minimize these harmful effects.

Get enough sleep. Getting a good night's sleep as you age is necessary for memory consolidation, the process of forming and storing new memories so you can retrieve them later. Sleep deprivation reduces the growth of new neurons in the hippocampus and causes problems with memory, concentration, and decision-making. It can even lead to depression—another memory killer.

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Watch what you eat. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables and drink green tea as these foods contain antioxidants in abundance, which can keep your brain cells from “rusting.” Foods rich in omega-3 fats (such as salmon, tuna, trout, walnuts, and flaxseed) are particularly good for your brain and memory. Eating too many calories, though, can increase your risk of developing memory loss or cognitive impairment.

Exercise regularly. Starting a regular exercise routine, including cardio and strength training, may reduce your risk of developing dementia by up to 50 percent. What's more, exercise can also slow further deterioration in those who have already started to develop cognitive problems. Exercise protects against Alzheimer's by stimulating the brain's ability to maintain old connections as well as make new ones.

Walking: An easy way to fight memory loss

New research indicates that walking six to nine miles every week can prevent brain shrinkage and memory loss. According to the American Academy of Neurology, older adults who walked between six and nine miles per week had more gray matter in their brains nine years after the start of the study than people who didn't walk as much.

Brain exercises to combat memory loss

Just as physical exercise can make and keep your body stronger, mental exercise can make your brain work better and lower your risk of mental decline. Try to find brain exercises that you find enjoyable. The more pleasurable an activity is to you, the more powerful its effect will be on your brain. You can make some activities more enjoyable by appealing to your senses—by playing music during the exercise, for example, or lighting a scented candle, or rewarding yourself after you've finished.

[Read: How to Improve Your Memory]

Here are some ideas for brain exercise, from light workouts to heavy lifting:

  • Play games you are not already familiar with that involve strategy, like chess or bridge, and word games like Scrabble. Try crossword and other word puzzles, or number puzzles such as Sudoku.
  • Read newspapers, magazines, and books that challenge you.
  • Get in the habit of learning new things: games, recipes, driving routes, a musical instrument, a foreign language. Take a course in an unfamiliar subject that interests you. The more interested and engaged your brain, the more likely you'll be to continue learning and the greater the benefits you'll experience.
  • Improve how well you do existing activities. If you already speak a foreign language, commit to improving your fluency. Or if you're a keen golfer, aim to lower your handicap.
  • Take on a project that involves design and planning, such as a new garden, a quilt, or a koi pond.

Authors: Melinda Smith, M.A., Lawrence Robinson, and Robert Segal, M.A.

Last updated: November 1, 2022

(Video) Jared Benge, PhD: 10 Things I Get Asked About the Aging Brain

FAQs

What are the 3 foods that fight memory loss? ›

What are the foods that fight memory loss? Berries, fish, and leafy green vegetables are 3 of the best foods that fight memory loss. There's a mountain of evidence showing they support and protect brain health.

What lack of vitamin causes memory loss? ›

Vitamin B12 deficiency is linked to impaired cognition and memory along with a sensation of tingling and numbness, an outcome of poor myelination. Elevated methylmalonic acid and serum homocysteine levels are markers of Vitamin B12 deficiency.

How can you tell the difference between dementia and old age forgetfulness? ›

Age-related memory loss and dementia are very different conditions, though they may share some overlap in symptoms. However, normal forgetfulness is often caused by lack of focus and it never progresses into serious territory. Dementia, on the other hand, will get worse over time.

What can I drink to improve my memory? ›

Brain-Boosting Beverages
  • Coffee. 1/12. If you can't get through the morning without a java jolt, you're not alone. ...
  • Green Tea. 2/12. ...
  • Berry Juices. 3/12. ...
  • Kombucha. 4/12. ...
  • Green Smoothie. 5/12. ...
  • Turmeric Tea. 6/12. ...
  • Beetroot Juice. 7/12. ...
  • Ginseng Tea. 8/12.
20 Dec 2020

How much B12 should I take daily for memory? ›

There are no specific dosage recommendations for B12 supplements for mental performance or mood. Optimal dosing of vitamin B12 varies by age, lifestyle, and dietary needs. The general recommendation for adults is 2.4 mcg.

What vitamin should I take to improve my memory? ›

Like vitamin D, vitamin B12 has so many mental benefits. Getting enough vitamin B12 may give you more energy, improve memory, and make learning new things easier. It also has been shown to help improve mood and lessen depressive symptoms.

Can B12 reverse dementia? ›

A diagnosis is B12 deficiency may be a reversible cause of confusion and behavior changes. In other words, it's possible that increasing your B12 level can improve or restore your memory and ability to think clearly. It can also resolve the other symptoms you may be experiencing such as fatigue and weakness.

What is the 5 word memory test? ›

Introduction: The five-word test (5WT) is a serial verbal memory test with semantic cuing. It is proposed to rapidly evaluate memory of aging people and has previously shown its sensitivity and its specificity in identifying patients with AD.

What three conditions are often mistaken for dementia? ›

Depression, nutritional deficiencies, side-effects from medications and emotional distress can all produce symptoms that can be mistaken as early signs of dementia, such as communication and memory difficulties and behavioural changes.

What is the 30 question test for dementia? ›

The Mini–Mental State Examination (MMSE) or Folstein test is a 30-point questionnaire that is used extensively in clinical and research settings to measure cognitive impairment. It is commonly used in medicine and allied health to screen for dementia.

What worsens short-term memory? ›

Possible culprits include: antidepressants, antihistamines, anti-anxiety medications, muscle relaxants, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, and pain medications given after surgery. Alcohol, tobacco, or drug use.

What is the best medication for short-term memory loss? ›

Cholinesterase inhibitors are the first choice of treatment for memory loss. The doctor may also prescribe the single-dose drug combination Namzeric to treat moderate to severe memory loss.

What is the best over the counter medicine for memory loss? ›

Prevagen is an over-the-counter (OTC) supplement that claims to support brain health and boost your memory.
...
There are currently five medications that are FDA-approved to treat memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease:
  • Donepezil (Aricept)
  • Memantine (Namenda)
  • Namzaric.
  • Rivastigmine (Exelon)
  • Galantamine (Razadyne)
18 May 2021

What is the best brain food for seniors? ›

There are even brain foods that could promote brain health.
  • Apples. The soluble fiber in apples may help lower cholesterol and maintain healthy blood sugar levels by slowing the uptake of glucose. ...
  • Blueberries. ...
  • Butternut Squash. ...
  • Dark Chocolate. ...
  • Garlic. ...
  • Mixed Nuts. ...
  • Pomegranates. ...
  • Turmeric.

Which fruit is best for brain? ›

Certain fruits such as oranges, bell peppers, guava, kiwi, tomatoes, and strawberries, contain high amounts of vitamin C. Vitamin C helps prevent brain cells from becoming damaged and supports overall brain health. In fact, a study found that vitamin C can potentially prevent Alzheimer's.

What three foods boost memory? ›

11 Best Foods to Boost Your Brain and Memory
  • Fatty fish. When people talk about brain foods, fatty fish is often at the top of the list. ...
  • Coffee. If coffee is the highlight of your morning, you'll be glad to hear that it's good for you. ...
  • Blueberries. ...
  • Turmeric. ...
  • Broccoli. ...
  • Pumpkin seeds. ...
  • Dark chocolate. ...
  • Nuts.

What two drinks are good for your brain? ›

15 Brain-Boosting Juices and Beverages
  • Coffee. Coffee is probably the most widely consumed nootropic beverage. ...
  • Green tea. Green tea's caffeine content is much lower than coffee's. ...
  • Kombucha. ...
  • Orange juice. ...
  • Blueberry juice. ...
  • Green juices and smoothies. ...
  • Turmeric lattes. ...
  • Adaptogen lattes.

Which coffee is best for brain? ›

This suggests that dark roasted coffee — whether regular or decaf — has the strongest protective effect on the brain.

What vitamin helps with the brain? ›

When it comes to brain health, focus on the three B's : vitamins B6, B12, and B9 (folate). “These three types of B vitamins are necessary for the brain's normal functioning,” says Dr. Agarwal, “and any deficiency in them may increase the risk of memory loss and other forms of cognitive decline.”

Is it OK to take 1000 mcg of B12 a day for seniors? ›

Recommended Vitamin B12 Dosage for Seniors

The proper vitamin B12 dosage for seniors depends on if they have underlying health conditions and how severe their deficiency is. In some cases, doctors may recommend high doses — more than 1,000 micrograms (mcg) per day.

Which fruit is rich in vitamin B12? ›

Fruits like apples, bananas, blueberries and oranges are some fruits that are high in vitamin B12.

Is it OK to take 1000 IU of B12 a day? ›

There is no risk of an overdose when taking large amounts of vitamin B-12 such as 1000 mcg, because it is a water-soluble vitamin. Meaning the body will use the amount that it needs then the excess will be excreted through urine.

Does B12 help with memory? ›

Though there is evidence to suggest that people who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and dementia are often deficient in this vitamin, studies have found that taking supplements or increasing dietary vitamin B12 does not improve memory function in those living with the disease, according to the Mayo Clinic.

What can I take naturally to improve my memory? ›

Memory Supplements With Potential
  1. Omega-3 fatty acid. Omega-3 fish oil supplements have piqued great interest. ...
  2. Huperzine A. Also known as Chinese club moss, this natural medicine works in a similar way as Alzheimer's drugs. ...
  3. Acetyl-L-carnitine. ...
  4. Vitamin E. ...
  5. Asian (or Panax) ginseng.
16 Dec 2010

Does fish oil improve memory? ›

Does Fish Oil Help With Memory? Yes, because the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish support good brain health, these nutrients also support the functions of the brain — which, of course, includes thinking and memory.

What is the number one best vitamin for brain function and combat dementia? ›

Vitamin B6: Vitamin B6 has been proven to improve brain function, nerve function and red cell production. Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid: Being deficient in both Vitamin B12 and folic acid is common in those with dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Can you take too much vitamin B12? ›

While the recommended daily amount of vitamin B-12 for adults is 2.4 micrograms, higher doses have been found to be safe. Your body absorbs only as much as it needs, and any excess passes through your urine. High doses of vitamin B-12, such as those used to treat a deficiency, might cause: Headache.

How much vitamin B12 should a 60 year old woman take? ›

Dosages for Older People

When you're in your 60s you should officially start getting blood tests to test for vitamin B12 deficiency. Around this age, you should be getting around 2.4 micrograms of B12 a day.

What is the clock test for dementia? ›

The clock-drawing test is a quick way to screen for early dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. It involves drawing a clock on a piece of paper with numbers, clock hands, and a specific time. The inability to do so is a strong indication of mental decline.

How can I test myself for early dementia? ›

The Self-Administered Gerocognitive Exam, known as SAGE, is a brief, pen-and-paper cognitive assessment tool designed to detect the early signs of cognitive, memory, or thinking impairments. The test evaluates your thinking abilities.

What is a quick test for dementia? ›

The MMSE and Mini-Cog test are two commonly used assessments. During the MMSE, a health professional asks a patient a series of questions designed to test a range of everyday mental skills. The maximum MMSE score is 30 points.

What is the 3 word memory test? ›

The Mini-Cog test.

A third test, known as the Mini-Cog, takes 2 to 4 minutes to administer and involves asking patients to recall three words after drawing a picture of a clock. If a patient shows no difficulties recalling the words, it is inferred that he or she does not have dementia.

Can dementia be seen on an MRI? ›

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Repeat scans can show how a person's brain changes over time. Evidence of shrinkage may support a diagnosis of Alzheimer's or another neurodegenerative dementia but cannot indicate a specific diagnosis. MRI also provides a detailed picture of brain blood vessels.

What is one of the first signs of cognitive decline? ›

Signs that you may be experiencing cognitive decline include: Forgetting appointments and dates. Forgetting recent conversations and events. Feeling increasingly overwhelmed by making decisions and plans.

What is the 5 minute test for early dementia? ›

The five-minute cognitive test (FCT) was designed to capture deficits in five domains of cognitive abilities, including episodic memory, language fluency, time orientation, visuospatial function, and executive function.

What questions are asked in a memory test? ›

The MMSE includes questions that measure:
  • Sense of date and time.
  • Sense of location.
  • Ability to remember a short list of common objects and later, repeat it back.
  • Attention and ability to do basic math, like counting backward from 100 by increments of 7.
  • Ability to name a couple of common objects.

Is there an online memory test for dementia? ›

MemoryHealthCheck is a free online resource to learn about human memory, the main causes of memory loss, and offers a new short term memory test based on visual images. 2. Worried about possible dementia or memory loss symptoms in someone close to you?

What medications can cause memory problems? ›

Caution! These 10 Drugs Can Cause Memory Loss
  • Antianxiety drugs (Benzodiazepines) ...
  • Cholesterol-lowering drugs (Statins) ...
  • Antiseizure drugs. ...
  • Antidepressant drugs (Tricyclic antidepressants) ...
  • Narcotic painkillers. ...
  • Parkinson's drugs (Dopamine agonists) ...
  • Hypertension drugs (Beta-blockers)
9 Feb 2016

Why do I forget things instantly? ›

Forgetfulness can arise from stress, depression, lack of sleep or thyroid problems. Other causes include side effects from certain medicines, an unhealthy diet or not having enough fluids in your body (dehydration). Taking care of these underlying causes may help resolve your memory problems.

What Superfoods delay short-term memory loss? ›

Blueberries: Antioxidants Fight Cognitive Decline. Not only are blueberries delicious, but they are good for your brain. Evidence accumulated at Tufts University suggests that the consumption of blueberries may help improve or delay short term memory loss.

What is the new medication for memory loss? ›

The drug aducanumab received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in June 2021 for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. However, there has been some controversy over the use of aducanumab for treating Alzheimer's disease.

Which blood pressure medications cause memory loss? ›

Beta-blockers are believed to cause memory issues by interfering with norepinephrine and epinephrine, which are both key chemical messengers in the brain. These anticholinergics may cause memory loss because they block the action of acetylcholine, a chemical messenger involved with many functions in the body.

Why do I forget words when speaking? ›

It is not necessarily a sign of something serious*, but more of an occasional brain glitch. Scientists have found that some things make TOTs more common – such as caffeine, fatigue, and strong emotions – and that words learned later in life are more likely to be forgotten.

What is the one food that fights dementia? ›

Olive oil, flax seeds, and fatty fish like tuna, salmon, and mackerel are examples of foods high in omega-3 fatty acids with DHA that helps your brain stay healthy. Many studies prove that omega-3s are effective at fighting and preventing dementia and recommend taking 200 mg of DHA daily to achieve good brain health.

Which fruit is best for brain memory? ›

Fruits. Certain fruits such as oranges, bell peppers, guava, kiwi, tomatoes, and strawberries, contain high amounts of vitamin C. Vitamin C helps prevent brain cells from becoming damaged and supports overall brain health. In fact, a study found that vitamin C can potentially prevent Alzheimer's.

Are bananas good for memory loss? ›

1. Go ape. Bananas are a great source of potassium, manganese, vitamin C and fibre, but did you know they can also enhance memory? Studies show eating bananas help students learn more efficiently and improve exam scores.

What is the best natural supplement for memory loss? ›

Natural Supplements and Vitamins for Treatment and Prevention of Dementia and Cognitive Decline
  • Ginkgo biloba. ...
  • Omega-3 fatty acids. ...
  • Ginseng. ...
  • Huperzine. ...
  • Vitamins B12 and B9 ...
  • Vitamin D. ...
  • Coconut oil/caprylidene. ...
  • Resveratrol and curcumin.
30 Aug 2016

Can vitamin D reverse dementia? ›

Evidence from animal and cellular studies suggests that vitamin D has multiple functions throughout the central nervous system and could be implicated in the prevention and treatment of disorders such as dementia and AD.

Is coffee good for dementia? ›

In the CAIDE study, coffee drinking of 3-5 cups per day at midlife was associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD by about 65% at late-life. In conclusion, coffee drinking may be associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD.

Should dementia patients watch TV? ›

For men and women with Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia, it can be especially beneficial. Watching movies and TV shows can help keep their brain active, which can stimulate positive memories, improve mood, and even increase socialization.

Which drink is good for brain? ›

Green tea is an excellent beverage to support your brain. Its caffeine content boosts alertness, its antioxidants protect the brain, and L-theanine helps you relax.

Is coffee good for your brain? ›

When consumed in moderation, coffee can be very good for your brain. In the short-term, it may improve mood, vigilance, learning, and reaction time. Long-term use may protect against brain conditions like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

What vegetable helps with memory loss? ›

Getting adequate vegetables, especially cruciferous ones including broccoli, cabbage and dark leafy greens, may help improve memory. Try a kale salad or substitute collard greens for a tortilla in your next sandwich wrap. Broccoli stir-fry also is an excellent option for lunch or dinner.

What vegetable helps with memory? ›

It is a known fact that green leafy vegetables contribute to better memory power. Spinach is loaded with folate and vitamins E and K, which play a significant role in slowing down cognitive decline. You can also include other veggies like cabbage and lettuce in your daily diet for better brain functioning.

What medicines can cause memory loss? ›

Caution! These 10 Drugs Can Cause Memory Loss
  • Antianxiety drugs (Benzodiazepines) ...
  • Cholesterol-lowering drugs (Statins) ...
  • Antiseizure drugs. ...
  • Antidepressant drugs (Tricyclic antidepressants) ...
  • Narcotic painkillers. ...
  • Parkinson's drugs (Dopamine agonists) ...
  • Hypertension drugs (Beta-blockers)
9 Feb 2016

What is the best over the counter vitamin for memory loss? ›

Prevagen is an over-the-counter (OTC) supplement that claims to support brain health and boost your memory.
...
There are currently five medications that are FDA-approved to treat memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease:
  • Donepezil (Aricept)
  • Memantine (Namenda)
  • Namzaric.
  • Rivastigmine (Exelon)
  • Galantamine (Razadyne)
18 May 2021

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Author: Gov. Deandrea McKenzie

Last Updated: 04/01/2023

Views: 6072

Rating: 4.6 / 5 (46 voted)

Reviews: 93% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Gov. Deandrea McKenzie

Birthday: 2001-01-17

Address: Suite 769 2454 Marsha Coves, Debbieton, MS 95002

Phone: +813077629322

Job: Real-Estate Executive

Hobby: Archery, Metal detecting, Kitesurfing, Genealogy, Kitesurfing, Calligraphy, Roller skating

Introduction: My name is Gov. Deandrea McKenzie, I am a spotless, clean, glamorous, sparkling, adventurous, nice, brainy person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.